Harry Shum Jr: This is What It's Like To Have Beyonce As Your Boss

author CNBC Make It.   3 mounths ago

Before becoming an actor, Glee and Crazy Rich Asians star Harry Shum Jr. was a backup dancer for Beyonce, Alicia Keys and Missy Elliott.

Shum discusses what made Beyonce such a great boss.

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Harry Shum Jr: This is what it’s like to have Beyonce as your boss | CNBC Make It.

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Fallon Schwurack moved to New York City from Salt Lake City, Utah to pursue her dream of being a musical theatre dancer. To make ends meet, she works full time as a server, while attending dance auditions. Fallon says she lives very comfortably in NYC on her server income. She makes less money dancing than serving, but Fallon says her happiness is more important than her salary. Here's how she earns and spends her money. Read more about Fallon's budget breakdown here: https://cnb.cx/2UB6dDA Introducing Millennial Money, our new interview series profiling millennials in different cities and at different income levels on how they make, spend and save their money. Fallon Schwurack tried to quit dancing. She went to college and earned a degree in biology. She worked in a lab for a few years and had plans to go back to school to become a medical examiner. But then a friend asked her to dance in a show as a favor. She accepted — and fell back in love with with dancing. Schwurack first learned to dance when she was just three years old and, after graduating from high school in Salt Lake City, she spent a year dancing professionally for a local ballet company. After getting pulled back onstage, she started going to auditions and landing parts in local performances around Salt Lake. Realizing she wanted to pursue dance full-time, she abandoned her plan to go back to school. So, in 2016, one day before her 30th birthday, Schwurack moved to New York City to try and dance professionally. She works as a restaurant server to make ends meet. Now 32, she's still building her career but, she says, she's able to live "very, very comfortably" on what she makes, and "getting to be able to dance every day is one of the best feelings I've ever had." Although dance is Schwurack's passion, she acknowledges that "it's really hard, actually being a dancer in New York City." For one thing, the competition is fierce: "When I go to an audition, open calls usually have around 300 girls there at least." And when Schwurack does land a job, it's both short-term and means taking a pay cut. "You live the poor actor life unless you have certain side jobs that make the money because a lot of the contracts aren't very lasting," she says. "Even if you get on Broadway they can last for a month or two, maybe up to six months. There's a few shows that are running for years, but things change and you might leave a show even if it doesn't close." Most of Schwurack's contracts have lasted around two months and paid between $350 and $500 per week. Because she's a non-equity dancer, her rates are lower. Equity dancers earn closer to $900 per week or more, she says. When she's not dancing, Schwurack works at the restaurant Tony's Di Napoli, where she earns around $60,000 a year. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $60K A Year In NYC – Millennial Money

Lori Harvey has been praised for dating and ditching celebrity men like Future, Trey Songz, Lewis Hamilton, and Justin Combs. However Beyonce fans weren't exactly pleased when they saw Lori "seemingly" flirting with Jay-Z at his Roc Nation Brunch. The exchange between Jay and Lori seemed harmless, but the Beyhive was not hesitant to put her on notice. #EmpressiveHottopics #rihanna #beyonce #normani #empressive Business Info ***** Contacts: http://twitter.com/EmpressiveTV Instagram: @EmpressiveTV snapchat: EmpressiveTV Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/empressivetv Email (business inquiries only): empressivefinesse@gmail.com Website: www.empressive.tv **** ________ Music: "Loop In Soul" A.V.A Beatz (Please Give credit for usage) https://soundcloud.com/avabeatz

Sweetgreen is now the restaurant world's first "unicorn," valued at over $1 billion. Started by three college friends out of their dorm room at Georgetown University, the salad company has 91 locations with more in the works and is vying to become the digital food platform of the future. Introducing The Upstarts, a new series about the companies you love that came out of nowhere and are now everywhere. Sweetgreen is the first-ever unicorn salad start-up, luring lunchtime lines across the country with its millenial- and Gen Z-friendly $12 salads. Now, the brand that brought the farm-to-table trend to fast-casual dining wants to be "the Starbucks of salads." "If I had told you 25 years ago, when Starbucks only had a few locations, that someday it would be a global phenomenon … nobody would have believed that. ... But, that's what happened," Sweetgreen investor and billionaire Steve Case told CNBC. Today, Starbucks has a market value of nearly $90 billion. "And so that's what we feel with Sweetgreen." Like Starbucks, Sweetgreen started with a single store. The brand was founded in 2007 after then-Georgetown students Jonathan Neman, Nicolas Jammet, and Nathaniel Ru (who met in an entrepreneurship class) got tired of the unhealthy and uninspiring food options around campus and decided to do something about it. "The most delicious food, the coolest food … was all the least healthy," Jammet tells CNBC Make It. "None of them made us feel that good, and we wanted to solve that problem." Neman, Jammet and Ru, all now 33, settled on the concept for Sweetgreen — fast but healthy meals that taste good and feature ingredients from local farmers — before they'd even finished taking their finals, and they hosted taste tests of future menu items with other students in Jammet's dorm room. "We even had these little anonymous surveys people could fill out," Jammet tells CNBC Make It. (An early iteration of the chain's Guacamole Greens salad was the most popular dish then, he says, and it remains one of the store's biggest fan favorites.) The friends raised over $300,000 from 50 investors — mainly family and friends — and three months after graduating, opened the first Sweetgreen in a 560-square-foot shack near the Georgetown University campus. The bathroom was bigger than the kitchen, Ru and Jammet remember. "We really had no idea what we were doing," Jammet says. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Sweetgreen How Sweetgreen became the Starbucks of salads with a valuation of over $1 billion | CNBC Make It.

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